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Effect of low level laser therapy (830 nm) with different therapy regimes on the process of tissue repair in partial lesion calcaneous tendon.

Oliveira FS1, Pinfildi CE, Parizoto NA, Liebano RE, Bossini PS, Garcia EB, Ferreira LM. - Lasers Surg Med. 2009 Apr;41(4):271-6. doi: 10.1002/lsm.20760. (Publication)
Double blind study shows that laser group had 99% recovery to pre-injured levels and the non-laser group showed extensive cellular damage under a microscope.
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There were 5 groups of rats in the study. Groups 2 through 5 were injured in a controlled operation. Groups 3 through 5 were given different dosage of laser therapy.

Group 1: No damage
Group 2: Damaged and then area treated with placebo
Group 3: Damaged and given non-optimal therapy
Group 4: Damaged and optimal dosage
Group 5: Damaged and non-optimal therapy

Any laser therapy showed a significant improvement over no laser and the optimal laser (Group 4 with a total dosage of 4 j/cm^2) showed no difference from the uninjured tissue. The image below show the group 2 and group 4 tissue under a polarization microscope.

study results

 


Intro: Calcaneous tendon is one of the most damaged tendons, and its healing may last from weeks to months to be completed. In the search after speeding tendon repair, low intensity laser therapy has shown favorable effect. To assess the effect of low intensity laser therapy on the process of tissue repair in calcaneous tendon after undergoing a partial lesion.

Background: Calcaneous tendon is one of the most damaged tendons, and its healing may last from weeks to months to be completed. In the search after speeding tendon repair, low intensity laser therapy has shown favorable effect. To assess the effect of low intensity laser therapy on the process of tissue repair in calcaneous tendon after undergoing a partial lesion.

Abstract: Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Calcaneous tendon is one of the most damaged tendons, and its healing may last from weeks to months to be completed. In the search after speeding tendon repair, low intensity laser therapy has shown favorable effect. To assess the effect of low intensity laser therapy on the process of tissue repair in calcaneous tendon after undergoing a partial lesion. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: Experimentally controlled randomized single blind study. Sixty male rats were used randomly and were assigned to five groups containing 12 animals each one; 42 out of 60 underwent lesion caused by dropping a 186 g weight over their Achilles tendon from a 20 cm height. In Group 1 (standard control), animals did not suffer the lesion nor underwent laser therapy; in Group 2 (control), animals suffered the lesion but did not undergo laser therapy; in Groups 3, 4, and 5, animals suffered lesion and underwent laser therapy for 3, 5, and 7 days, respectively. Animals which suffered lesion were sacrificed on the 8th day after the lesion and assessed by polarization microscopy to analyze the degree of collagen fibers organization. RESULTS: Both experimental and standard control Groups presented significant values when compared with the control Groups, and there was no significant difference when Groups 1 and 4 were compared; the same occurred between Groups 3 and 5. CONCLUSION: Low intensity laser therapy was effective in the improvement of collagen fibers organization of the calcaneous tendon after undergoing a partial lesion.

Methods: Experimentally controlled randomized single blind study. Sixty male rats were used randomly and were assigned to five groups containing 12 animals each one; 42 out of 60 underwent lesion caused by dropping a 186 g weight over their Achilles tendon from a 20 cm height. In Group 1 (standard control), animals did not suffer the lesion nor underwent laser therapy; in Group 2 (control), animals suffered the lesion but did not undergo laser therapy; in Groups 3, 4, and 5, animals suffered lesion and underwent laser therapy for 3, 5, and 7 days, respectively. Animals which suffered lesion were sacrificed on the 8th day after the lesion and assessed by polarization microscopy to analyze the degree of collagen fibers organization.

Results: Both experimental and standard control Groups presented significant values when compared with the control Groups, and there was no significant difference when Groups 1 and 4 were compared; the same occurred between Groups 3 and 5.

Conclusions: Low intensity laser therapy was effective in the improvement of collagen fibers organization of the calcaneous tendon after undergoing a partial lesion.

Original Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19347936

Secret to renewed teeth? Lasers show gleam of hope

David Mooney,Harold Slavkin, Karen Weintraub - USA Today May 28, 2014 (Publication)
This article from USA Today talks about repairing tooth enamel on rats teeth and the implication of laser therapy.
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The following is an except from a USA today article. Please visit the link at the bottom so see the entire article.

What if a cavity could fill itself, a broken tooth regrow? That's the promise of work published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

By shining light from a low-powered laser – about the brightness of a sunlit day – researchers were able to turn on a natural healing program and regrow dentin, the material inside a tooth. So far, they can only do this in rodents, but they could receive approval to test it in people within a year.

If it succeeds, the approach might also work for regrowing heart tissue, fighting inflammation and repairing bone and wounds, the researchers say.

"There's potential for this to be broadly useful," said David Mooney, the Harvard University bioengineer, who was the paper's senior author.

The promise is fantastic, said Harold Slavkin, a molecular biologist and professor of dentistry at the Ostrow School of Dentistry at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. By mimicking a process already found in nature, Mooney's work has the potential to eventually transform medical care, enabling people someday to regrow their own livers, hearts or kidneys, he said.

"Twenty or 30 years from now people may say, 'Isn't it ridiculous that they used to transplant organs from one person to the other,'" Slavkin said.

Co-author Praveen Arany, a dentist and pathologist, said he got interested in the potential healing power of light after hearing anecdotes about light's ability to repair wounds and regrow hair. Laser light at very low frequencies does nothing, and at higher frequencies is commonly used to cut and cauterize tissue, so the dose of light has to be carefully delivered, said Arany, who initiated the research while a student in Mooney's lab.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He spent years carefully calibrating light levels to discover an optimal dose.

At appropriate levels, the light appears to trigger a chemical reaction that releases reactive oxygen species, a potentially damaging type of molecule.

In response to the reactive oxygen, the body's natural healing process activates a protein called Transforming Growth Factor (or TGF)-beta, which plays crucial roles in embryonic development, wound healing and the immune system. The TGF-beta stimulates production of new dentin, the material at the center of the tooth.

Arany and Mooney demonstrated that they can trigger this cascade of events and produce dentin by shining a low-powered laser on a rodent's tooth.

What they can't do yet is stimulate an entire tooth to regrow – the new dentin lacks the structure of a tooth, Mooney said. But Arany, now with the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, is hopeful of finding a way to get the body to rebuild structures, too.

"If we can figure out a way of activating those (processes), that would be really cool," he said.

Anne George, an endowed professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Dentistry, praised the work as impressive and important.

"If it works in a clinical trial setting, I think it will be great," she said.


Original Source: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/05/28/lasers-regrow-teeth/9608231/

Home Search Introduction

Ken Teegardin - (Video)
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Welcome to the laser-therapy.us research tool. This tool is a searchable collection of technical publications, books, videos and other resources about the use of lasers for photobiomodulation. This tool includes almost the entire U.S. library of medicine research papers on LLLT, videos from Youtube associated with therapy lasers and the tables of contents from laser therapy books. This allows users to search for a keyword or condition and see resources about using lasers to treat that condition. All the resources include links to the original source so we are not making any statement about the use of lasers for treating non-FDA cleared application, we are simple summarizing what others have said.  Where every possible, we have included a link to the orginal publication.

Here are some of our favorite queries:

This tool uses a broad match query so:

  • It does not correct spelling and searches only cold laser related subjects so do not use LLLT, cold or laser in the search bar
  • It works better with shorter search terms or even parts of search terms
  • It searches all the available fields so you can enter a body part, author, condition or laser brand.
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  • This system is only for photobiomodulation or cold laser therapy research (including LLLT, laser acupuncture and high power laser therapy) only. It does NOT include photodynamic laser therapy (where the laser is used to react with a pharmaceutical), hot surgery lasers or cosmetic lasers. It does include some resources on weight loss and smoking cessation.

The results of the search are sorted based on 3 quality factors on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the best score. Originally all the resources were given a 5-5-5 until they could be individually evaluated. These scores are purely opinion and are only used to simplify the rank of the results from more valuable to least valuable. This should not be considered a critique of any work. This system was created to help researchers (including ourselves) find the most usable resources for any cold laser therapy research. The resources are assigned values based on the following 3 factors:

  • Efficacy: The resource (especially research papers) should show a significant improvement in the condition being treated. Resources that show better results are given a higher quality score.
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Over the past few years of working with research, we found that a majority of the published resources are lacking in one of these three ranking factors.
The original goal of this research tool was to tie published resources to the protocols in the laser-therapy.us library. This connection allows users to trace each protocol back to a list of resources so the protocol can be researched and improved.

General Comments


POWER
When many of the first research papers were published, the most power laser available for therapy were less than 100mW and many systems had to be pulsed to keep the laser from burning out too quickly. Today, system are available that will deliver up to 60,000mW of continuous output. Because of these power limitation, many early studies were limited to extremely low dosages by today’s standards. It takes a 50mW system 17 minutes to deliver 50 joules at the surface of the skin. If this was spread over a large area of damage or was treating a deeper problem, the actual dosages were much less than 1J/cm2.  Today, we know that these dosages typically produce very little or no results.
WAVELENGTH
About 80% of the resources in this database are in the near infrared wavelength. There is also some interest in the red wavelength (600 to 660nm) . Other wavelengths like blue, purple, and green have very little scientific research behind them and have not gotten much traction in the core therapy market with the exception of some fringe consumer products.
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